IMPERFECTION IS BEAUTY, THE LESSON OF LINDBERGH

by Ilaria Dotta, October 2017 (Italy)


"Beauty," says Peter Lindbergh, "is the courage to be yourself." It is the androgynous body of Kristen McMenamy, the intense expression of Blanca Li, the wrinkles of Pina Bausch. It is the beauty of imperfection which, in a new form of realism which redefines aesthetic standards, becomes splendour.   "This is the real strength of Lindbergh, what makes him different from all other fashion photographers: his unique viewpoint," explains Thierry-Maxime Loriot, curator of the exhibition entitled “Peter Lindbergh. A Different Vision on Fashion Photography”, which opens today in the Venaria Palace.   STORYTELLING   A retrospective, produced by Kunsthal Rotterdam, which does not merely present some of the German artist's best-known works, but aims to tell a story. That of a fashion photographer capable of addressing social themes and fixing in black and white with one click the passage of time. "Many photographers are obsessed with perfection," continues Loriot. "Peter, on the other hand, manages to work with imperfections and transform them." Because this is precisely what Lindbergh does: tracking down in the world, among people's faces and industrial landscapes, a more or less hidden beauty. "I am convinced that this should be the role of photographers today," declares the 73-year-old artist, "freeing human beings from the terror of youth and perfection."  THE CONCEPT OF NORMALITY There are not merely enlargements of the supermodels Kate Moss, Cindy Crawford and Linda Evangelista. "The concept of normality is important," emphasizes the curator. "Peter's photos are timeless, and there is no hierarchy or social status. It is never a snobbish viewpoint. These are the greatest portraits of our century." The exhibition, which will remain shown in the Sale delle Arti until 4 February, is precisely an opportunity to better understand the vision and thinking of the “photographer of truth”, who for the design of this exhibition agreed to open up his archives, offering the public not only a view of some of his most famous shots, but also unpublished pictures,